Category Archives: Video Games

I know a grown man liking video games, what?! weird I know, but their kool

Dead Space Art

Dead_Space_Sm
Dead Time? Nope
So this is a little kiddish art but, that’s why I like it. The gruesome story of Dead Space and the soft clean fun world of kids. It comes from P.A. native J Gray, who has some other great drawings not to mention great beer label art. Check out his blog Burn to Build Here

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Fallout: The Movie, With Hookers!?

A post-apocalyptic dark comedy about a man trying to get some hookers. Part of a series entitled “Nuclear Coleslaw.” Is how the Youtube channel describes this short film set in the Fallout Universe. So I’m kinda mad I missed this dlc/mod. But, as short films go this is pretty good. I like the white balance to it. Not sure if its cause of the compression or what but all the scenes inside the plane body are pretty dark. Lets hope there is more to come.

Boy Scouts of America to Hand Out Video Game Merit Pin

Video Game Pin
The Holy Grail of Boy Scout Pins - Video Gaming

So when I was a wee little lad, I had fond memories of my brother being in Cub Scouts. I got all the benefits of being in the Scouts but didn’t get any of the social humiliation. We’d go on camping trips on state land some where in Northern Michigan. When we got there we’d learn how to start fires, find edible food stuff in the woods, catch fish. The normal Boy Scout stuff, the stuff you see in the movies or hear about from a family friend. Hey even once in a while, we carve Soap Box cars and have some races. And for each of these events or skills you’d earn a badge of sorts. Showing them off to your “boy scout” friends was just another way of being cool.

But never, and I mean never did my brother or I ever get a Pin for Video Games. I mean come on if we did then I’d hope they’d make higher levels then just one. Cause that badge/pin would be the shining crown of my collection! I’d leave a ton of space around it, that no other pin could come in even close to this one. It would stand out like a beacon to all the other boys, “Hey look at this, I play video games. And I’m good, so good it hurts. So suck it Noob!” or something along those lines. I never got my great grammar or speaking badge.

But, that point a side, I think this is one of the best things that old stuffy institution has done. I mean yes there are things you have to do in order to receive said pin but hey your still getting rewarded to play video games. So Den Mother Gladys if your reading this I would love my Video Game Pin ASAP. I believe after my many long hours of researching and playin video games I deserve this much. See and you said they would only rot our brains HA! Oh, Pat can get one too.

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Penny Arcade Creaters Make 2010 TIME 100

Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins
Jerry Holkins (back) and Mike Krahulik (front) of Penny Arcade
Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins met in high school in Spokane, Wash., in 1993. Mike was obsessed with drawing. Jerry was obsessed with words. Both were obsessed with video games. They probably would have gone pretty far in whatever field they went into, but the field they went into was drawing an online comic strip about video games called Penny Arcade, which they started in 1998. It’s about two guys named Gabe and Tycho who play games and hang out with a talking video player with a drinking problem, a terrifying robotic fruit juicer and Jesus. By 2000 it was popular enough that Krahulik and Holkins could quit their day jobs. It currently runs three times a week and has about 3.5 million readers.

For a lot of people, that would have been enough. But in 2003, Krahulik and Holkins, with their business manager, Robert Khoo, started a charity called Child’s Play that sends video games to sick kids in more than 60 hospitals around the world. In 2004 they started the Penny Arcade Expo, a convention in Seattle that celebrates gaming culture. Last year more than 60,000 people turned out for it.

Krahulik and Holkins have become the tastemakers, and conscience, of an industry the size of Hollywood. But for all their success, they are almost compulsively self-deprecating, and they give all the credit to their fans. You can’t put a label on them. Labels smack of hype, and Penny Arcade doesn’t do hype. “We don’t think about it,” Holkins says. “We specifically don’t try to figure out what we are.” Krahulik adds, deadpan: “Except rad.”

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1984685_1984940_1985513,00.html#ixzz0mVwm57LW